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Bicycling

Monday, March 27, 2017

In two weeks, San Francisco will celebrate Giants Opening Day. This week, the Giants will host the Oakland Athletics for two pre-season games at AT&T park.

With the start of baseball season comes planning for getting to and from SF's beautiful ballpark. 

Muni light rail vehicle passes in front of AT&T Park.
Muni light rail vehicles travel down King Street in front of AT&T Park.

As in previous years, there are many choices for travel during baseball season — designed to facilitate safe, timely and reliable service to and from the ballpark and beyond.

Friday, March 17, 2017

This week, we released our Two-Year Vision Zero Action Strategy for 2017-2018, the foundation for how and why San Francisco is working to end traffic deaths on our streets.

The document comes just as the San Francisco Board of Supervisors unanimously adopted a resolution this week urging the California State Legislature and Governor to pass California State Assembly Bill 342, the Safe Streets Act of 2017. This bill would give San Francisco and San Jose the authority to pilot automated speed enforcement – a proven, cost-effective solution to help us move toward Vision Zero.

Our new Vision Zero Action Strategy outlines the initiatives city departments must lead to reach that goal, the challenges we face and the drive behind our commitment to making it a reality. It’s also a look at our progress since San Francisco adopted Vision Zero in 2014, including the number of lives lost in 2016 and the impact of our efforts to bring it to zero.

The strategy is focused on three main outcomes San Francisco needs to achieve to eliminate traffic fatalities: Safe streets, safe people and safe vehicles.

Three icons with text. Safe streets, safe people, safe vehicles.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Rendering of the Wiggle
“Neighborway” projects will combine traffic-calming design features like raised crosswalks and sidewalk bulb-outs, like those seen in this rendering for the Wiggle Neighborhood Green Corridor Project.

Neighborhood streets should feel quiet, safe and inviting, especially to walk and bike to nearby destinations like parks, schools and shops. But residential streets often need design help to feel truly welcoming, especially if you’re taking kids along for the journey.

As laid out in our new Pedaling Forward document this week, we’re launching a new type of street design project called “neighborways.” Open houses for the first of these projects — on Page Street and 8th Avenue — will take place this Saturday and next week (more on those below).

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

 People watching a musical performance on a car-free roadway at Sunday Streets on Valencia Street.
Sunday Streets on Valencia Street in the Mission.

Nothing says spring has sprung better than the arrival of the Sunday Streets season in San Francisco.

So mark this Sunday, March 12 on your calendar, because that's when the first event of 2017 kicks off on Valencia Street in the Mission, between Duboce Avenue and 26th Street, from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.

Sunday Streets is an annual series of events in the city that turn large sections of streets in the heart of neighborhoods throughout San Francisco into car-free spaces for celebration. Tens of thousands of people come out to bicycle, enjoy musical entertainment, learn about SF neighborhoods and explore the area in a way you can't do during a typical day with traffic on the streets. The celebrations are held each month from March through October.

For the 10th year, the SFMTA will participate as the primary city sponsor of Sunday Streets, an event organized by the nonprofit Livable City in partnership with agencies including the Department of Public Health and the Office and Economic and Workforce Development.

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Photo of people bicycling by a totem-shaped bicycle counter with a digital display on Market Street. Text states, Pedaling Forward, A Glance at the SFMTA’s Bike Program for 2017 - 2021.

More and more people in San Francisco see their bicycle as a convenient way to get around as we invest in a network of safer, better bikeways. As these bikeways grow, so does interest about what the future of bicycling in San Francisco will look like.

Today, we’re releasing a new document to share our vision and the plans in place to build a better city for biking: Pedaling Forward: A Glance at the SFMTA’s Bike Program for 2017 - 2021.

This guide helps explain our approach to creating a bike-friendly city and the current five-year outlook on our city’s strategy to invest more than $112 million in 92 miles of bike infrastructure projects, as laid out in our Fiscal Year 2017-2021 Capital Improvement Plan (PDF).

Creating a connected network of safe, low-stress streets for bicycling is crucial to keeping our city moving sustainably and to reaching the city’s Vision Zero goal to eliminate all traffic fatalities.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Intersection of 8th Avenue and Anza Street.
Proposals for the 8th Avenue Neighborway Project will be featured at an open house on March 15.

Board of Directors Meeting

Tuesday, March 7, 1 p.m.
City Hall, Room 400
Nearby Muni routes: 5, 19, 21, 47, 49, F Market, Metro-Civic Center Station

The agenda for tomorrow’s Board of Directors meeting includes traffic modifications  for the Palou Avenue Streetscape Project and a contract for the M Ocean View Track Replacement Project.  The Board’s agenda is posted online.

Our Board of Directors meetings are usually held on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. The agendas are posted under “meetings” on the Board’s webpage 72 hours in advance.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

A person bikes on Valencia Street in a bike lane placed between a lane of parked cars and a sidewalk curb, with parking meters featuring instructional flyers.

San Francisco’s first raised, parking-protected bike lane, which we wrote about in October, was completed this week on a short stretch of northbound Valencia Street, south of Cesar Chavez Street.

This street design flips around the conventional setup of car parking and bike lanes most San Franciscans are used to. Instead of the bike lane being placed between parked cars and the traffic lane, the bike lane runs curbside between the sidewalk and parked cars, with space to load in between. And in this case, the bike lane is physically raised slightly from the roadway by a small curb.

Since Monday morning, we’ve seen all cars parked in line with the new arrangement, and we’ve heard strongly positive responses from people on the street. That’s no surprise, since this configuration helps organize the street into a more predictable pattern for people walking, biking and driving.

Friday, February 10, 2017

A car appears blurry as it moves through a crosswalk in a San Francisco intersection with pedestrians crossing in the background.
Automated speed enforcement is a proven way to reduce traffic injuries caused by speeding.

Police can’t be everywhere at once to enforce against dangerous speeding. That's why the SFMTA joined Assemblymember David Chiu, Mayor Ed Lee, Mayor Sam Liccardo of San Jose and other partners this week to announce new legislation to allow San Francisco and San Jose to pilot automated speed enforcement in California.

Automated speed enforcement (ASE) is a proven tool to reduce deadly speeding and crashes. It uses cameras, similar to those used to enforce red light violations, with vehicle speed sensors to snap photos of license plates of motor vehicles traveling above a defined speed limit.

ASE is already used in 142 communities across the country, and others abroad, and has yielded consistent results including:

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Two photos of newly-renovated Mansell Street in McLaren Park, before and after it was redesigned. The top, older photo shows the roadway with only vehicle traffic on either side of a center planted median. The bottom, newer photo shows the road with walking and biking paths on one side of the median, and vehicle traffic on the other.
Mansell Street in McLaren Park, before (top) and after (bottom). Top photo: SF Rec and Park. Bottom photo: SF Public Works/Twitter.

Half of Mansell Street in McLaren Park is now a beautiful path for walking, biking and jogging.

Despite the rain this weekend, we joined community members and our partners to celebrate the opening of San Francisco’s first-of-its-kind street transformation.

Mansell is now a much more fun and inviting way to enjoy and cross McLaren Park, SF’s second-largest city-owned park, between the Visitacion Valley, Portola and Excelsior neighborhoods. One side of the roadway on Mansell, which used to have four lightly-used traffic lanes split by a median — and no formal path for people on foot or bike — is now car-free.

Mansell’s previous design was conceived in the 1950s as part of a cross-town freeway that was never completed. The new design, on the other hand, was chosen by community members through a two-year public planning process.

Friday, February 3, 2017

Bike lane at road-level, with green-painted pavement and plastic posts separating it from vehicle traffic.
In light of findings on raised bike lanes on Market Street (shown here before it was raised), Polk Street's northbound bike lane will now look similar to this.

With construction on Polk Street’s two-year transformation underway, we’ve made a change to the plan for a raised bike lane in light of our recent research on best design practices.

The previous plan for the Polk Streetscape Project included a raised bike lane, with a two-inch mountable curb, on the northbound side of Polk from McAllister to Pine streets. But in our experiment with different curb designs last year on Market Street, we found that raised bike lanes on commercial streets like Polk should have a parking-protected configuration, with a lane of car parking and loading zones between the bike lane and the roadway, to prevent drivers from parking in the bikeway.

Making room for that parking lane on Polk would require major changes to the plan already under construction. To make the bike lane safer without a major delay, the northbound bike lane will no longer be raised but will be built at road level with plastic safe-hit posts and a painted buffer zone to separate it from the traffic lanes.