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Walking

Thursday, February 23, 2017

People walk diagonally across the intersection of Clay and Kearny streets.
During a "pedestrian scramble," traffic signals allow people to cross in every direction, including diagonally.

At bustling city intersections, the nature of walking provides a particular advantage: When everyone moves at a human pace, people on foot can safely cross in every direction at the same time.

That’s the idea behind a “pedestrian scramble,” a traffic signal feature that can make traffic flow more safely and efficiently at certain busy intersections.

Yesterday, we joined community members to celebrate our newest scramble at Clay and Kearny streets, where Chinatown meets the Financial District.

Pedestrian scrambles are an addition to the usual cycle of traffic signal phases – a green light and “walk” signal for one street, a red light for the other. During a “scramble” phase, all traffic lights turn red, and all “walk” signals turn on, even in diagonal directions. That lets people cross the street without having to worry about turning drivers who fail to yield to them.

Friday, February 10, 2017

A car appears blurry as it moves through a crosswalk in a San Francisco intersection with pedestrians crossing in the background.
Automated speed enforcement is a proven way to reduce traffic injuries caused by speeding.

Police can’t be everywhere at once to enforce against dangerous speeding. That's why the SFMTA joined Assemblymember David Chiu, Mayor Ed Lee, Mayor Sam Liccardo of San Jose and other partners this week to announce new legislation to allow San Francisco and San Jose to pilot automated speed enforcement in California.

Automated speed enforcement (ASE) is a proven tool to reduce deadly speeding and crashes. It uses cameras, similar to those used to enforce red light violations, with vehicle speed sensors to snap photos of license plates of motor vehicles traveling above a defined speed limit.

ASE is already used in 142 communities across the country, and others abroad, and has yielded consistent results including:

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Two photos of newly-renovated Mansell Street in McLaren Park, before and after it was redesigned. The top, older photo shows the roadway with only vehicle traffic on either side of a center planted median. The bottom, newer photo shows the road with walking and biking paths on one side of the median, and vehicle traffic on the other.
Mansell Street in McLaren Park, before (top) and after (bottom). Top photo: SF Rec and Park. Bottom photo: SF Public Works/Twitter.

Half of Mansell Street in McLaren Park is now a beautiful path for walking, biking and jogging.

Despite the rain this weekend, we joined community members and our partners to celebrate the opening of San Francisco’s first-of-its-kind street transformation.

Mansell is now a much more fun and inviting way to enjoy and cross McLaren Park, SF’s second-largest city-owned park, between the Visitacion Valley, Portola and Excelsior neighborhoods. One side of the roadway on Mansell, which used to have four lightly-used traffic lanes split by a median — and no formal path for people on foot or bike — is now car-free.

Mansell’s previous design was conceived in the 1950s as part of a cross-town freeway that was never completed. The new design, on the other hand, was chosen by community members through a two-year public planning process.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Tree-lined intersection with pedestrians and cars crossing and bright yellow and green markings.

Last month, we unveiled the latest street design upgrade for SF — a protected intersection at 9th and Division streets. A protected intersection uses simple features like concrete islands to make moving through the intersection safer for everyone, whether they’re walking, biking or driving. 

Today, we’re sharing a video with more details and a link to some interesting time lapse videos of the changes with thanks to local transportation advocate Thomas Rogers.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

A view of the newly upgraded intersection of 9th and Division streets, looking west down Division.
The newly upgraded intersection of 9th and Division streets, looking west down Division.

San Francisco’s first “protected intersection” is ready for a spin at 9th and Division streets.

Protected intersections use simple design concepts to make everyone safer. Instead of requiring people driving and biking to look over their shoulders for one another, traffic movements are arranged so that everyone can see what's going on by simply looking forward.

We were thrilled to unveil this forward-looking design in San Francisco yesterday with Mayor Ed Lee and our partners at SF Public Works and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans).

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Annual Report cover image, with a photo of people boarding a Muni train.
Our 2016 Annual ReportDelivering Progress, is now available.

For us, 2016 was a year of transportation milestones.

Sure, we roll up our sleeves and work every day to improve the experience of traveling around San Francisco. But some of the key initiatives that shaped our agency’s work in fiscal year 2016, laid out in our new Annual Report, show how we we’ve gained ground on the four goals outlined in our agency’s Strategic Plan: Providing safer transportation, better travel choices, improving the environment and quality of life and delivering outstanding service to San Francisco.

Take these examples of how we’ve recently made the city’s transportation network safer and more reliable:

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Riders exiting L Taraval train

We’re moving the L Taraval Rapid Project forward with improvements to make the street safer and improve Muni service starting in January.

After engaging with the community to shape proposed changes approved in September, early enhancements are coming to make Taraval safer for everyone who depends on it — including the Muni riders who make 30,000 trips on the L Taraval each day.

Friday, December 2, 2016

Folsom Street with car traffic and bicycle riders in a bike lane.

How can we make Folsom and Howard streets in SoMa better and safer? Share your ideas at one of our two open house events next week.

We’re kicking off the Folsom-Howard Streetscape Project to look at ways to make these streets safer and provide better options to get around in the growing South of Market neighborhood.

Next week, we’ll collect input on how to do that at two open house events on Thursday, Dec. 8 and Saturday, Dec. 10. We’re hosting two similar open houses to help ensure people with a variety of schedules can come, but both events will feature the same materials, information and opportunity to provide feedback.

Thursday, December 1, 2016

People on the Winter Walk plaza at night.

Puppies and kittens, food and coffee, playing and relaxing - in the middle of a street near Union Square? It must be Winter Walk.

Winter Walk SF has returned for a third holiday season, which means a temporary two-block promenade is now in place on Stockton Street, between Geary and Ellis streets. Now until January 1 is your chance to enjoy the scene of a downtown street filled with people strolling, enjoying food trucks, coffee carts and beer gardens, all enlivened with a dazzling host of events.

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Pedestrians and a Muni bus cross 4th Street on Market from the 5th and Mission garage.
The 5th and Mission garage is conveniently located to great shopping, dining and sight-seeing options in SF.

For many, the holiday season isn’t complete without a trip to the city for shopping and dining. However you get around, have a safe and festive holiday season.

Remember, events like the Union Square Christmas Tree Lighting on Nov. 25 and the season-long Winter Walk on Stockton Street are great attractions for all ages and are very accessible by public transit, walking, riding a bike and taking a taxi. Get more details about these events, Thanksgiving Muni schedules and other upcoming transit and traffic advisories.

If you drive to popular areas like Union Square, let parking in one of the 38 SFMTA public parking garages and lots be the antidote to what can be a holiday hassle. The parking spaces – more than 14,000 of them – tend to fill up less than on-street spaces, allowing you to circle less while looking for parking. And compared to privately-owned garages, public garages often cost considerably less.