HeadsUp: The annual #ChineseNewYear Parade will commence Saturday, Feb. 4, at 5:30pm from Market & 2nd St. Some #SFMuni reroutes will begin at 10am while others at 2 p.m. Regular svc will resume after roadway is clear (approx. 10pm). For svc details:https://t.co/qNRIndWkgN https://t.co/5BuefSNsfZ (More: 21 in last 48 hours)

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2022 Muni Art

The 2022 theme, “Streets of San Francisco” is the seventh year that the SFMTA, San Francisco Beautiful and The Poetry Society of America (sponsors of Poetry in Motion®) have collaborated to bring art and poetry to Muni commuters.

The 2022 Muni artists are:

Krithika Sengottaiyan

Artistic interpretations of the San Francisco skyline in front of the Golden Gate Bridge and Marin hills, surrounded by water

Richard Louis Perri

Mirror-image artistic portraits of a bearded and beret-capped male figure, possibly Lawrence Ferlinghetti, in salmon and teal colors with a dark blue and purplish background

Sebastian Raphael

An outline of a cable car is flanked by plants. In the background is a sky filled with fluffy clouds, floating open books and trolley wires. A street sign tells us this is the zero block of Russian Hill. Signs on the cable car feature a Muni logo and read "Beautiful San Francisco" and "Russian Hill, Telegraph, Beacon & Chapel Hills".

Steffan Sanguinetti

The Golden Gate Bridge casts a shadow on the Bay. The Marin Headlands and islands appear in the background. A small craft floats on the Bay between the bridge and the shadow.

Tan Sirinumas

A lighthouse sits on top of Fort Point beneath an underspan of the Golden Gate Bridge. Sparks fill the sky behind the arch.

The 2022 Muni poet and poems are:

Lawrence Ferlinghetti (1919-2021), a founder of City Lights, San Francisco, and a beat poet. Muni-Art-featured poems are:

The Changing Light

Recipe for Happiness in Khaborovsk or Anyplace

Populist Manifesto

At the Golden Gate

from What is Poetry?