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Friday, February 17, 2017

As part of our ongoing efforts to move Muni Forward, we’re launching a package of small but important service adjustments on Saturday, February 25.

Based on feedback from Muni riders, we’re increasing service and on popular routes, adding bigger buses on the 5 Fulton and making stop and schedule adjustments to make service faster, roomier and more reliable.

Here are all of the Muni lines and routes affected – find the full details below:

  • F Market, L Taraval, L Owl, 5/5 Rapid, 5 Owl, 7X, 8AX/BX, 10, 12, 25, 27, 28 Rapid, 29, 48

A 60-foot Muni bus parked in a garage with its front door open.
A 60-foot New Flyer bus at Muni's Flynn Division.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Within our vast historic photo archive are a handful of panoramic gems – sets of images that were composed so to be placed side-by-side and form a wide view.

Thanks to modern digital imaging technology, we can stitch these shots together to experience these historic views from a unique perspective.

This week, we'll share a couple of these panoramic views from 1906 and 1928.

Black and white photo showing damaged houses, leaning and sinking into the ground on South Van Ness and 18th St, taken May 9, 1906 after great earthquake and fire.
Destroyed and leaning houses along Howard St. (today, South Van Ness Ave.) between 18th and 19th streets on May 9, 1906.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

President’s Day Holiday Muni Service and Parking Enforcement

This Monday, in observance of President’s Day, Muni will operate on a Saturday schedule.

Parking meters and restrictions for seven-day street sweeping will be enforced.

However, there will be no enforcement of parking restrictions for:

  • Monday through Friday street sweeping
  • Residential parking permits
  • Commute hour tow-away zones

For complete details, visit the holiday enforcement schedule webpage.

45 travelling through Chinatown in the afternoon.
Southbound 45 Union/Stockton travelling through Chinatown to Caltrain on June 6, 2016. SFMTA Photo Archive

Event:

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Woman on a bicycle with traffic and Civic Center buildings behind her.
Chairman Brinkman pedals in front of City Hall during Bike to Work Day last spring. Photo taken May 12, 2016.

As the new chairman of the SFMTA Board of Directors, Cheryl Brinkman is happy to use the skills she’s learned through a lifetime of transportation advocacy to help form the city's transportation agenda.

Like most San Franciscans, Chairman Brinkman gets around in a variety of ways, including walking, biking, Muni, taxis as well as bike-share and car-share services. Her enthusiasm for all of these choices make her a great leader for the agency.

"My vision for the SFMTA is that we continue to make transportation improvements in a thoughtful, transparent and informed way," she said. "I hope that our streets continue to become safer and more welcoming for all ages and we continue to increase trips with sustainable modes of transportation."

Monday, February 13, 2017

The SFMTA Chinese New Year Parade contingent stepped off Saturday evening with firecrackers, pounding drums and the ring of a cable car bell. Aboard an authentic cable car, operated on a bus chassis, operators, Central Subway project team members and other staff joined the more than 100 other units of sister city agencies, community organizations, sponsors and elected officials. Celebrating the Year of the Rooster, this year's parade wound through downtown — Union Square and Chinatown.

A tall, glittery rooster sits at the fronts of the Southwest parade float.

A towering rooster proclaimed the start of the new year from the front of the Southwest Airlines float.

Friday, February 10, 2017

A car appears blurry as it moves through a crosswalk in a San Francisco intersection with pedestrians crossing in the background.
Automated speed enforcement is a proven way to reduce traffic injuries caused by speeding.

Police can’t be everywhere at once to enforce against dangerous speeding. That's why the SFMTA joined Assemblymember David Chiu, Mayor Ed Lee, Mayor Sam Liccardo of San Jose and other partners this week to announce new legislation to allow San Francisco and San Jose to pilot automated speed enforcement in California.

Automated speed enforcement (ASE) is a proven tool to reduce deadly speeding and crashes. It uses cameras, similar to those used to enforce red light violations, with vehicle speed sensors to snap photos of license plates of motor vehicles traveling above a defined speed limit.

ASE is already used in 142 communities across the country, and others abroad, and has yielded consistent results including:

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Man on a Muni bus feeding cash bills into a farebox.
A growing number of Muni riders board with their proof of payment in pocket. Thanks for paying your fare and for riding Muni.

If it ever seems that only a few Muni riders pay their fare, it may be because most customers simply pay before they board.

Under our system of fare enforcement, everyone on Muni is expected to have proof of payment ready to show fare inspectors, who could request it any time. So anyone who has a valid paper transfer, monthly Clipper card pass or an activated ticket on the MuniMobile app may not feel the need to take it out of their pocket until requested by fare inspectors.

And by and large, they do. The rate of fare evasion was estimated at just 7.9 percent in 2014 (PDF), the last year we conducted a survey (expected to be updated this year). That estimate dropped from 9.5 percent in 2009.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Photo of a Chinese lantern with "CAM," "Happy New Year" and "Muni" written in English next to Chinese characters, on the inside of a motorized cable car.
A Chinese lantern inside a motorized cable car during the 2016 Chinese New Year Parade.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Two photos of newly-renovated Mansell Street in McLaren Park, before and after it was redesigned. The top, older photo shows the roadway with only vehicle traffic on either side of a center planted median. The bottom, newer photo shows the road with walking and biking paths on one side of the median, and vehicle traffic on the other.
Mansell Street in McLaren Park, before (top) and after (bottom). Top photo: SF Rec and Park. Bottom photo: SF Public Works/Twitter.

Half of Mansell Street in McLaren Park is now a beautiful path for walking, biking and jogging.

Despite the rain this weekend, we joined community members and our partners to celebrate the opening of San Francisco’s first-of-its-kind street transformation.

Mansell is now a much more fun and inviting way to enjoy and cross McLaren Park, SF’s second-largest city-owned park, between the Visitacion Valley, Portola and Excelsior neighborhoods. One side of the roadway on Mansell, which used to have four lightly-used traffic lanes split by a median — and no formal path for people on foot or bike — is now car-free.

Mansell’s previous design was conceived in the 1950s as part of a cross-town freeway that was never completed. The new design, on the other hand, was chosen by community members through a two-year public planning process.