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Post-Pandemic Slow Streets

SFMTA.com/PostPandemicSlowStreets
Project Introduction
July 26, 2021 Update: The Sanchez and Shotwell Slow Street projects will not be attending the originally scheduled July 30th SFMTA Engineering Public Hearing. At this time, the SFMTA Engineering Public Hearing dates for both Sanchez or Shotwell Slow Streets have not been scheduled yet. The Slow Streets team will be attending the August 3rd SFMTA Board of Directors meeting. At the meeting, the Slow Streets team will give an update on the overall program and discuss and seek authorization on the planned futures of the Sanchez and Shotwell Slow Streets. Click here to get more info on SFMTA Board of Directors meetings or for instructions on how to access the August 3rd meeting.

  
Stay up to date and informed on future dates for public comment by subscribing to project updates for the Sanchez and Shotwell Slow Street projects. The Slow Streets team will also update this webpage with the most up-to-date information on events and public comment opportunities for Sanchez, Shotwell, and other post-pandemic Slow Street initiatives. 

Slow Streets are temporary traffic restrictions implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic in San Francisco. These restrictions are authorized to continue 120 days beyond the lifting of the State of Emergency.

Many Slow Streets have become community gathering places and safe spaces for people to share the roadway. The SFMTA is currently evaluating all Slow Streets corridors to determine recommendations for a post-pandemic future.

For more information on the Slow Streets program, visit the main webpage at SFMTA.com/SlowStreets.


 

Post-Pandemic Slow Streets Process

path to permanence process graphic

Slow Street Extension Feasibility Criteria: 

The following criteria will be used to determine if a temporary Slow Street is feasible for extension beyond the pandemic:

  • Neighborhood Residential Street – At a minimum, the street should be classified as a neighborhood residential street with low traffic volumes.

  • Support for Permanence - Strong support is shown from residents living on the Slow Street and the overall neighborhood for permanent changes. This is measured by community outreach efforts and evaluation tools like Slow Street perception surveys.  

  • Local Community Partner – Ideally, the designated street has an identified local community group or organization that supports the Slow Street.  

  • Consistency with Plans – The designation of a Slow Street on a corridor is consistent with city planning efforts (e.g., the corridor has been identified in the Bike Network or the Green Connections Plan, or it’s been identified as a pedestrian- or bike-priority street in the General Plan or another community planning effort). 

  • Traffic Data Evaluation – Traffic volume data shows that a street's designation as a Slow Street has not had negative impacts on the surrounding transportation network.  

Slow Streets Currently Being Evaluated

  • 20th Street from Lexington Street to Potrero Avenue
  • 23rd Avenue from Lake to Cabrillo streets
  • Arkansas from 23rd to 17th streets
  • Arlington from Roanoke to Randall streets
  • Cabrillo Street from 45th to 25th avenues
  • Chenery Street from Burnside Avenue to Lippard Avenue
  • Clay Street from Arguello Boulevard to Steiner Street
  • Duncan from Guerrero to Sanchez streets
  • Excelsior Avenue from London to Munich streets
  • Golden Gate Avenue from Masonic Avenue to Broderick Street
  • Lake Street from 28th to Second avenues
  • Lombard between Mason and Powell streets
  • Mariposa Street from Kansas to Mississippi streets
  • Minnesota from Mariposa to 22nd streets
  • Noe Street from Duboce to Beaver streets and 17th to 18th streets
  • Pacific Avenue from Steiner to Gough streets
  • Somerset Street from Silver Avenue to Woolsey Street
  • Tompkins Avenue from Andover to Putnam streets

Slow Streets in Community Outreach and Design

Community outreach and design processes are underway for some Slow Streets Virtual open houses are currently live to gather feedback on potential additional traffic safety treatments on the Slow Street in their neighborhood. The Slow Streets team will host a number of virtual meetings to talk about these streets and additional tools used to improve safety and visibility

Shotwell Slow Street

The Slow Street on Shotwell Street between 14th Street and Cesar Chavez is currently in the outreach and design phase to develop a post-pandemic design. The second virtual open house and public commenting period on the Slow Street design have now concluded. The team will no longer attend the July 30th SFMTA Engineering Public Hearing for this effort. Please check back at a later time for an update on the new date for Public Hearing for the Shotwell Slow Street. We encourage the public to subscribe to project email and text updates. 

Public Hearing Date: To be determined

SFMTA Board of Directors Meeting: August 3rd, 2021.

The virtual open house webpage will remain active so the public can continue to learn more about Shotwell Slow Street.

Shotwell Slow Street Virtual Open House

Sanchez Slow Street

The Slow Street on Sanchez Street between 23rd and 30th streets is currently in the outreach and design phase to develop a post-pandemic design. The second virtual open house and public commenting period on the Slow Street design have now concluded.

The team will no longer attend the July 30th SFMTA Engineering Public Hearing for this effort. Please check back at a later time for an update on the new date for Public Hearing for the Sanchez Slow Street. We encourage the public to subscribe to project email and text updates. 

Public Hearing Date: To be determined

SFMTA Board of Directors Meeting: August 3rd, 2021.

The virtual open house webpage will remain active so the public can continue to learn more about Sanchez Slow Street.

Sanchez Slow Street Virtual Open House

Page Slow Street

 The Slow Street changes on Page Street between Gough and Stanyan will combine with other Page Street roadway changes including the 2019 Page Street Bikeway Pilot Project. This combined Page Slow Street project will allow more implementation and evaluation of temporary traffic changes (including on Haight Street near Octavia Boulevard) and public engagement prior to finalizing and approving more permanent measures. More information coming soon!  

The following corridors are not yet on the path to permanence but may be included once additional data is gathered:

  • New Slow Streets, including:
    • 12th Avenue
    • Cayuga Avenue
    • Hearst Avenue
    • Holly Park Circle
    • Lyon Street
    • SoMa Slow Streets
  • Slow Streets in District 4 - the future of these corridors will be explored further as part of the SFCTA District 4 Mobility Study 

Funding

This program was made possible in part by Proposition K Sales Tax dollars provided by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority. 

SFCTA logo

Contact Information