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Thursday, February 23, 2017

People walk diagonally across the intersection of Clay and Kearny streets.
During a pedestrian "scramble," traffic signals allow people to cross in every direction, including diagonally.

At bustling city intersections, the nature of walking provides a particular advantage: When everyone moves at a human pace, people on foot can safely cross in every direction at the same time.

That’s the idea behind a pedestrian "scramble,” a traffic signal feature that can make traffic flow more safely and efficiently at certain busy intersections.

Yesterday, we joined community members to celebrate our newest scramble at Clay and Kearny streets, where Chinatown meets the Financial District.

Pedestrian scrambles are an addition to the usual cycle of traffic signal phases – a green light and “walk” signal for one street, a red light for the other. During a “scramble” phase, all traffic lights turn red, and all “walk” signals turn on, even in diagonal directions. That lets people cross the street without having to worry about turning drivers who fail to yield to them.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Muni Service Changes This Saturday

Our latest round of Muni Forward service changes will include:

  • Stop removals on the L Taraval Line
  • More frequent service on the 8AX Bayshore Express, 25 Treasure Island and 29 Sunset
  • Moving the 28R 19th Avenue Rapid Route’s southern terminal to Geneva and San Jose avenues
  • More 60-foot trolley buses on the 5 Fulton and 5R Fulton Rapid routes

For complete details on all the upcoming changes and affected routes, please see our February 17 blog post.

Tent covered vending tables line a narrow walkway on both sides as people look and shop.
The Treasure Island Flea on April 23, 2016. Photo: Fabrice Florin/Flickr.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

We’re pioneering new types of traffic signal designs to reduce illegal left turns along Muni’s T Third Line, and we need your input.

The two signal designs below were recently installed at intersections on 3rd Street. With efforts including a new survey, you can weigh in on which signal is more effective at making intersections safer while making Muni Metro lines faster and more reliable.

Which of these signals most effectively indicates that a train is coming through the intersection? Take our survey and let us know.

 A traffic signal featuring a flashing, filled-in image of a train on tracks attached to a pole beneath a left turn traffic signal and above a "Do Not Enter" sign. 

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Over the past month, we’ve been rolling out the initial Muni Forward safety treatments along Taraval Street as part of the L Taraval Rapid Project. Despite the ongoing rain, we’ve made progress on every component, including the “clear zones,” upgraded boarding zones and transit-only lanes.

Here’s a look at our progress on Taraval so far.

People on Taraval Street board a stopped Muni train from the roadway with pavement markings that say, "TRANSIT BOARDING ZONE" and a posted sign that says, "STATE LAW - STOP HERE WHEN" along with an image of a train and passenger.
Pilot boarding zone upgrades on Taraval at 40th Avenue.

Friday, February 17, 2017

As part of our ongoing efforts to move Muni Forward, we’re launching a package of small but important service adjustments on Saturday, February 25.

Based on feedback from Muni riders, we’re increasing service and on popular routes, adding bigger buses on the 5 Fulton and making stop and schedule adjustments to make service faster, roomier and more reliable.

Here are all of the Muni lines and routes affected – find the full details below:

  • F Market, L Taraval, L Owl, 5/5 Rapid, 5 Owl, 7X, 8AX/BX, 10, 12, 25, 27, 28 Rapid, 29, 48

A 60-foot Muni bus parked in a garage with its front door open.
A 60-foot New Flyer bus at Muni's Flynn Division.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Within our vast historic photo archive are a handful of panoramic gems – sets of images that were composed so to be placed side-by-side and form a wide view.

Thanks to modern digital imaging technology, we can stitch these shots together to experience these historic views from a unique perspective.

This week, we'll share a couple of these panoramic views from 1906 and 1928.

Black and white photo showing damaged houses, leaning and sinking into the ground on South Van Ness and 18th St, taken May 9, 1906 after great earthquake and fire.
Destroyed and leaning houses along Howard St. (today, South Van Ness Ave.) between 18th and 19th streets on May 9, 1906.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

President’s Day Holiday Muni Service and Parking Enforcement

This Monday, in observance of President’s Day, Muni will operate on a Saturday schedule.

Parking meters and restrictions for seven-day street sweeping will be enforced.

However, there will be no enforcement of parking restrictions for:

  • Monday through Friday street sweeping
  • Residential parking permits
  • Commute hour tow-away zones

For complete details, visit the holiday enforcement schedule webpage.

45 travelling through Chinatown in the afternoon.
Southbound 45 Union/Stockton travelling through Chinatown to Caltrain on June 6, 2016. SFMTA Photo Archive

Event:

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Woman on a bicycle with traffic and Civic Center buildings behind her.
Chairman Brinkman pedals in front of City Hall during Bike to Work Day last spring. Photo taken May 12, 2016.

As the new chairman of the SFMTA Board of Directors, Cheryl Brinkman is happy to use the skills she’s learned through a lifetime of transportation advocacy to help form the city's transportation agenda.

Like most San Franciscans, Chairman Brinkman gets around in a variety of ways, including walking, biking, Muni, taxis as well as bike-share and car-share services. Her enthusiasm for all of these choices make her a great leader for the agency.

"My vision for the SFMTA is that we continue to make transportation improvements in a thoughtful, transparent and informed way," she said. "I hope that our streets continue to become safer and more welcoming for all ages and we continue to increase trips with sustainable modes of transportation."

Monday, February 13, 2017

The SFMTA Chinese New Year Parade contingent stepped off Saturday evening with firecrackers, pounding drums and the ring of a cable car bell. Aboard an authentic cable car, operated on a bus chassis, operators, Central Subway project team members and other staff joined the more than 100 other units of sister city agencies, community organizations, sponsors and elected officials. Celebrating the Year of the Rooster, this year's parade wound through downtown — Union Square and Chinatown.

A tall, glittery rooster sits at the fronts of the Southwest parade float.

A towering rooster proclaimed the start of the new year from the front of the Southwest Airlines float.

Friday, February 10, 2017

A car appears blurry as it moves through a crosswalk in a San Francisco intersection with pedestrians crossing in the background.
Automated speed enforcement is a proven way to reduce traffic injuries caused by speeding.

Police can’t be everywhere at once to enforce against dangerous speeding. That's why the SFMTA joined Assemblymember David Chiu, Mayor Ed Lee, Mayor Sam Liccardo of San Jose and other partners this week to announce new legislation to allow San Francisco and San Jose to pilot automated speed enforcement in California.

Automated speed enforcement (ASE) is a proven tool to reduce deadly speeding and crashes. It uses cameras, similar to those used to enforce red light violations, with vehicle speed sensors to snap photos of license plates of motor vehicles traveling above a defined speed limit.

ASE is already used in 142 communities across the country, and others abroad, and has yielded consistent results including: