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Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Muni buses on Market Street travel down red-colored transit-only lanes, approaching riders waiting on a boarding island, with a bus shelter labeled, "Muni Rapid."
A screenshot from the Streetfilms video, “Riders First: How Buses Are Moving San Francisco Forward.”

It can be easy to lose track of all our efforts to move Muni Forward, so it’s helpful to get a fresh look and take stock of the work we’ve done.

A video released last week called “Riders First: How Buses Are Moving San Francisco Forward,” produced by the nonprofit organizations Streetfilms and TransitCenter, highlighted our “systematic, rider-centric approach to improving bus service across the city.”

Monday, March 13, 2017

A visualization of Geary Boulevard at Buchanan Street with Geary Rapid improvements. People, including a chauffeured group school children, cross Geary using crosswalk that's separated into two sections by a waiting area in the median. Muni buses use red-colored, curbside transit-only lanes.
A visualization of Geary Boulevard at Buchanan Street with Geary Rapid improvements.

March 29 Update: The next major step for the Geary projects (both the Geary Rapid project and the Geary Boulevard Improvement Project) is a hearing at an SFMTA Board of Directors meeting this summer to complete local environmental review approvals. Then, once the Federal Transit Administration has signed off on the final environmental impact statement, the Geary Rapid project team will complete the outreach described below to finalize design details. Implementation of the Geary Rapid improvements is expected to start next year. 

We’re gearing up to start the first set of Geary transit upgrades later this year.

In the coming months, we will launch further outreach for the Geary Rapid Project, which focuses on early improvements on the stretch of the 38 Geary route between Market Street and Stanyan streets. In the meantime, we will finalize the design and construction of longer-term improvements for the Geary Boulevard Improvement Project.

With the Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) approved unanimously by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority (SFCTA) Board in January, lead management of the project is transitioning from the SFCTA to the SFMTA, which will design and implement Geary improvements as two separate projects. 

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Rendering of the Wiggle
“Neighborway” projects will combine traffic-calming design features like raised crosswalks and sidewalk bulb-outs, like those seen in this rendering for the Wiggle Neighborhood Green Corridor Project.

Neighborhood streets should feel quiet, safe and inviting, especially to walk and bike to nearby destinations like parks, schools and shops. But residential streets often need design help to feel truly welcoming, especially if you’re taking kids along for the journey.

As laid out in our new Pedaling Forward document this week, we’re launching a new type of street design project called “neighborways.” Open houses for the first of these projects — on Page Street and 8th Avenue — will take place this Saturday and next week (more on those below).

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Photo of people bicycling by a totem-shaped bicycle counter with a digital display on Market Street. Text states, Pedaling Forward, A Glance at the SFMTA’s Bike Program for 2017 - 2021.

More and more people in San Francisco see their bicycle as a convenient way to get around as we invest in a network of safer, better bikeways. As these bikeways grow, so does interest about what the future of bicycling in San Francisco will look like.

Today, we’re releasing a new document to share our vision and the plans in place to build a better city for biking: Pedaling Forward: A Glance at the SFMTA’s Bike Program for 2017 - 2021.

This guide helps explain our approach to creating a bike-friendly city and the current five-year outlook on our city’s strategy to invest more than $112 million in 92 miles of bike infrastructure projects, as laid out in our Fiscal Year 2017-2021 Capital Improvement Plan (PDF).

Creating a connected network of safe, low-stress streets for bicycling is crucial to keeping our city moving sustainably and to reaching the city’s Vision Zero goal to eliminate all traffic fatalities.

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Daylight Saving Reminder:

Don’t forget to turn your clocks forward one hour this Sunday as Daylight Saving Time begins. It’s a good chance to test your smoke detectors and replace their batteries if needed.

Transbay Terminal Construction Alert:

Now through Saturday, April 1: Construction work for the Transbay Terminal requires a closure of Beale Street between Mission and Howard streets. All routes terminating at Transbay Terminal will have minor re-routes.

Events

Take advantage of the dry weather this weekend and enjoy the parades, music, food and fun in the downtown, Visitacion Valley and Mission District areas.

SFPD mounted units leading parade in 2007.
Members of the San Francisco Police Department’s Mounted Unit at the start of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 17, 2007. Photo credit: Sam Soneja/Flickr.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

 People watching a musical performance on a car-free roadway at Sunday Streets on Valencia Street.
Sunday Streets on Valencia Street in the Mission.

Nothing says spring has sprung better than the arrival of the Sunday Streets season in San Francisco.

So mark this Sunday, March 12 on your calendar, because that's when the first event of 2017 kicks off on Valencia Street in the Mission, between Duboce Avenue and 26th Street, from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.

Sunday Streets is an annual series of events in the city that turn large sections of streets in the heart of neighborhoods throughout San Francisco into car-free spaces for celebration. Tens of thousands of people come out to bicycle, enjoy musical entertainment, learn about SF neighborhoods and explore the area in a way you can't do during a typical day with traffic on the streets. The celebrations are held each month from March through October.

For the 10th year, the SFMTA will participate as the primary city sponsor of Sunday Streets, an event organized by the nonprofit Livable City in partnership with agencies including the Department of Public Health and the Office and Economic and Workforce Development.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Intersection of 8th Avenue and Anza Street.
Proposals for the 8th Avenue Neighborway Project will be featured at an open house on March 15.

Board of Directors Meeting

Tuesday, March 7, 1 p.m.
City Hall, Room 400
Nearby Muni routes: 5, 19, 21, 47, 49, F Market, Metro-Civic Center Station

The agenda for tomorrow’s Board of Directors meeting includes traffic modifications  for the Palou Avenue Streetscape Project and a contract for the M Ocean View Track Replacement Project.  The Board’s agenda is posted online.

Our Board of Directors meetings are usually held on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. The agendas are posted under “meetings” on the Board’s webpage 72 hours in advance.

Friday, March 3, 2017

An artists rendering shows the intersection of Van Ness and Union once construction is complete, including center-running bus lanes and boarding platforms.

We joined our partner agencies, elected officials and community members Wednesday to celebrate the start of construction on the Van Ness Improvement Project, which will include San Francisco’s first bus rapid transit system.

“This project is essential to reshaping how San Franciscans get around the city efficiently," said SFMTA Director of Transportation Ed Reiskin. “Van Ness will benefit from better transit, strengthened infrastructure and safer streets for all."

Thursday, March 2, 2017

 "100 years on the J Church March 4th & 5th at the Old Mint- 88 5th St. at Mission"
Join us at SF History Days to travel through the history of the J Church, one of Muni’s oldest lines, from its opening in 1917 to today.

This weekend, we'll join over 70 other historical organizations and museums for San Francisco History Days 2017, a two-day exposition of San Francisco history from A to Z.

The event takes place Saturday and Sunday, March 4 and 5, at the Old Mint on 5th Street at Mission Street.

We'll put on a short slideshow exhibit exploring the 100-year history of Muni’s J Church Line.  Here's a sneak peek of a few photos from the exhibit.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

A person bikes on Valencia Street in a bike lane placed between a lane of parked cars and a sidewalk curb, with parking meters featuring instructional flyers.

San Francisco’s first raised, parking-protected bike lane, which we wrote about in October, was completed this week on a short stretch of northbound Valencia Street, south of Cesar Chavez Street.

This street design flips around the conventional setup of car parking and bike lanes most San Franciscans are used to. Instead of the bike lane being placed between parked cars and the traffic lane, the bike lane runs curbside between the sidewalk and parked cars, with space to load in between. And in this case, the bike lane is physically raised slightly from the roadway by a small curb.

Since Monday morning, we’ve seen all cars parked in line with the new arrangement, and we’ve heard strongly positive responses from people on the street. That’s no surprise, since this configuration helps organize the street into a more predictable pattern for people walking, biking and driving.