ATTN: Due to slow moving IB #subwaysvc, OB service from Embarcadero is seeing gaps and extended wait times. (More: 24 in last 24hrs)

Vision Zero SF

Everyone in San Francisco deserves to feel safe on city streets. That’s why our transportation agency joined city leaders in 2014 to adopt a policy called Vision Zero, with the goal of eliminating all traffic deaths in San Francisco.

The city's Vision Zero initiative relies on education, engineering and enforcement efforts to make traffic deaths in SF a thing of the past and we are strongly committed to this work. From protected bike lanes and new traffic signals, to more visible crosswalks and pedestrian countdown signals that tell you how much crossing time remains, we build safety into our streets. We spearhead transportation projects across the city that benefit all road users. And we partner with public health workers, police officers, advocates and policymakers to cultivate safer streets.

Since adopting Vision Zero as a policy in 2014, the City and County of San Francisco has upgraded its streets with safety and engineering improvements, launched enforcement programs and embarked on education campaigns aimed at addressing the top causes of crashes on San Francisco’s roadways. The city has also expanded its data analysis capabilities to ensure city agencies can continue to develop and implement data-driven solutions. In the past three years, San Francisco has implemented more than 40 miles of safety improvements, including 1,600 separate installments on San Francisco streets annually. Some 42,000 citations have been issued to drivers for the five most-dangerous traffic infractions — running red lights, running stop signs, violating pedestrian right-of-ways, speeding and failure to yield while turning. The city has also recently launched an anti-speeding campaign and initiated a pedestrian safety program called Safe Streets SF.

San Francisco is a world-class city. No mistake on the road should result in the loss of life.

Please join us in our mission to end traffic deaths.

Visit the city's Vision Zero website